93. Finding God in the Abundance — with Sr. Josephine Garrett, CSFN


A photo from Sr. Josephine's profession of final vows in November 2020 (Facebook)

About the episode | Listen to the episode | Meet Sr. Josephine Garrett


About the episode

"I thought it had to be lost and left in order for me to move forward, and it was more like it had to be given over, to be transformed and made new for what was ahead." Sr. Josephine Garrett is a Sister of the Holy Family of Nazareth with an incredible story and journey. She was raised Baptist, studied Political Philosophy, and worked in banking. During her time in banking, she had a desire to be a woman of God, and through this entered into the Catholic Church. With an even deeper desire to serve God, she began discerning and became a religious sister, and now works as a licensed counselor. In this episode, Sr. Josephine shares her incredible journey of becoming Catholic and a religious sister, her passion for serving children as a counselor, and the important truth that our God is a God of abundance, and not scarcity.


Listen to the episode


Meet Sr. Josephine Garrett

Sister Josephine Garrett is a native Texan, born and raised in Houston. She moved to Dallas in 1999 to begin studies at the University of Dallas where she completed a BA in Political Philosophy with a Business Concentration. Sister subsequently entered the banking industry, serving for 10 years as a Vice President in the Home Loans division of Bank of America in the roles of Operations Manager of a staff of 200 and later as a Project Manager. Sister was raised Baptist and entered the Catholic Church in 2005. Later, in November of 2011, she began her formation to be a religious Sister. In November of 2020 Sister Josephine professed her final vows as a Sister of the Holy Family of Nazareth.


She is a licensed counselor. serving as the school counselor for the cathedral grade school in Tyler, TX, and also in private practice. Sister has also served in vocations ministry and as a national speaker for youth and young adults, speaking to groups of up to 25,000.


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